Cypress School - Classroom 1

Winterhawk Animal Communication, session 1 of 5
All the animal groups on the farm introduced themselves and explained their natures - the horses, Rudy, the goats, the sheep and the alpacas.
CS1 Edited Animal Communications 12.17.1[...]
MP3 audio file [9.5 MB]
Winterhawk Animal Communication, session 2 of 5
Rudy insists on speaking first. He explains that the animals are here to deify the heart.
CS1 Edited Animal Communications 12.17.1[...]
MP3 audio file [10.8 MB]
Winterhawk Animal Communication, session 3 of 5
Fancy speaks up and adds to what Rudy has to say. She explains how the animals use telepathy to communicate with these kids.
CS1 Edited Animal Communications 12.17.1[...]
MP3 audio file [11.8 MB]
Winterhawk Animal Communication, session 4 of 5
Fancy asks who really has the problem here? Who has the truth and the love to be understood?
CS1 Edited Animal Communications 12.17.1[...]
MP3 audio file [14.6 MB]
Winterhawk Animal Communication, session 5 of 5
Cimmaron explains that what's inside every molecule is love and what's outside every molecule is love; that's the way the Universe is constructed and how it's held together...it's everything...
CS1 Edited WED FEB 29 2012 Animal Commun[...]
MP3 audio file [9.6 MB]

Cindy Evans, teacher of Classroom 1 at Cypress School in Petaluma, arranged a field trip for her eight students to meet our horses and donkey at the Petaluma ranch. 

 

These students are severely autistic, nonverbal, and from 17-22 years of age.  There was a ratio of nearly one adult to each student from Cypress School for the field trip. 

 

Barbara Pinelli, volunteer for Cimmaron Sanctuary and rescuer of Rudy, managed Rudy, our Lead Ambassador - Miniature Donkey.  Gwen managed Fancy, our Lead Ambassador - Horse.

 

We observed several remarkable exchanges during this visit.  One student petted Fancy, stepped away, then came back to her and gave her a hug, then returned a third time to give her a kiss on the cheek. 

 

Another student began stroking Fancy's neck frenetically - so fast we could hardly focus on the movement.  Placing a hand on top of his and moving at a slower rate slowed down his stroking, until it was a "normal" slow speed for petting a horse.  Suddenly, his whole body relaxed, he stepped back from Fancy, and he gave us a huge, peaceful smile. 

 

The third student was very timid around Fancy, however, she repeatedly touched Fancy on the neck, smiled, then touched her again. 

 

Rudy was doing the same work as Fancy with the other students, and they both used the same technique:  standing still as a statue and head down, completely nonresistant and nonjudmental.

 

Later we walked over to the petting zoo, where the students and the goats, alpacas and sheep could quietly take stock of each other. 

 

Cindy remarked about the calming effect the animals and the outdoors had on her students.